13 Reasons Why, the shocking and controversial teen drama that depicted suicide, sexual assault, substance abuse, and bullying, is back for a surprising second season.

In the first season of the Netflix original series, a group of teens listen to a series of tapes recorded by Hannah Baker before she commits suicide. Hannah explains the role each of her friends played in her death, and reveals the effects that a long year of bullying and isolation had on her life. There were 13 tapes, and 13 episodes, and the story seemed finished… but there’s more.

Season two of 13 Reasons Why will release on Netflix on May 18, and while the first season unfolded around a series of audio tapes, the story will continue through Polaroid pictures.

After Hannah’s parents discover their daughter’s audio recordings and learn what happened to her, they decide to sue Liberty High, holding the school responsible for her eventual suicide—and that’s where season two picks up.

“Over the course of the season, the trial unfolds. The kids are called in to testify, we get to hear their side of the story, secrets are revealed and we learn things we didn’t know before. That’s a mystery that Clay, with the help of Tony and some of the other friends, will unfold over the course of the season that ends up being very instrumental in the trial,” creator Brian Yorkey tells the Hollywood Reporter.

Season two is reportedly more about healing than anything else, and takes a closer look at survivors of sexual assault. It looks like viewers can expect most of the original cast back to unveil more details about Hannah and her friends, as the show continues to dive into serious topics affecting teens across the country.

13 Reasons Why sparked a lot of controversy among parents, teachers, and mental health professionals, with petitions to remove the show from Netflix and warnings not to let kids watch, due in large part to the graphic content and nature of the show, which some believe glamorizes suicide. This time around, Netflix launched a dedicated site to help teens who might be in crisis, including a message from the cast, resources on depression and suicide, and contact info for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

H/t: Hollywood Reporter